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THE OVERCOMPENSATING EFFECT (HORMONE REPLACEMENT)

THE OVERCOMPENSATING EFFECT (HORMONE REPLACEMENT)
3rd March 2020

OK, now what I want to talk about here is something that I like to call "the overcompensating effect". The overcompensating effect is everything you need to do on hormone replacement to outweigh any potential risks involved with testosterone replacement. Remember how I talked about being on testosterone replacement for a few years and having no health related issues?

Well what I'm talking about here is how to take care of you for the long haul. I believe that under proper medical supervision, with regular blood work, testosterone replacement is relatively safe IF YOU LIVE A HEALTHY AND ACTIVE LIFESTYLE!! But just know that eating clean, keeping up on your cardio training, and avoiding certain addictions and vices in life becomes even more important when you're on TRT.

Things such as donating blood, cardio training, and clean eating are what will outweigh any potential risks that would be involved down the road if you were at risk for any negative outcome under testosterone replacement. I believe risks to be very minimal if everything is intact, and I also believe the health consequences of low testosterone far outweigh any risks involved with replacement therapy. But with that being said, if you're using testosterone as a quick fix for a lazy lifestyle, if you are an alcoholic, constantly eating junk food, smoking cigarettes, or anything else that can negatively impact your health, then you may have worse health effects by adding in hormone replacement or running any type of testosterone derivative for any prolonged period of time.

CARDIO

I've talked about donating blood on the regular, but what else can you do to stay as healthy as possible while walking around beyond what nature had intended your hormone levels to be at your age?

Well, I would keep up with the cardio on a regular basis for starters. This doesn't have to be a cardio machine either; short rest periods between sets at the gym are very beneficial for elevating your heart rate as well. Your heart is the most important muscle in your body and chances are if you have been using steroids for a long time, then your heart is already enlarged to some degree. A slight enlargement of the heart isn't a big issue, but a significant enlargement of the heart can be.

EAT LESS

I would strongly suggest a diet that is lower in calories than what you are eating now or may have eaten 10 or 20 years ago. It's been statistically proven that people who eat lower calorie diets live longer. You don't need to starve yourself here, but very few men beyond the age of 35 years old should be eating more than 3,000 calories a day on a regular basis.

I have been living off a diet that is less than 3,000 calories a day for the past 3-4 years now and it hasn't had much of an effect on my muscular development. I still walk around at a lean 220+ lbs and if you ask me, even that is too much weight for someone of my height to carry beyond 35 years old (I'm 5'9" and single digit body fat). Whether it's fat weight or muscle weight, it's not good for your heart to have to work that hard throughout the majority of your life. As you get older and walk around heavier for a long period of time, it certainly doesn't get any easier to lose the weight. If you're overweight, I would strongly suggest working on this right now. It may be difficult at first, but our bodies are pretty good at adapting to change. I'm willing to bet if you could get those calories down for a month or so you would get used to it.

RELAX

I have found that as I've aged it just gets harder to relax sometimes. I suggest finding an activity that helps you relax and practicing this on a regular basis. Whether it's a breathing technique, a yoga class, relaxing in the sauna or jacuzzi, or sitting on a park bench enjoying some scenery, just get into something on a regular basis that will help wind you down and relax.

Maybe a new bed would help you relax more at night so you could fall asleep easier, or a routine massage every couple weeks. How about an oxygen bar or one of these new hyperbaric oxygen chambers that are springing up? I've had people tell me these places have improved their sleep a lot.

You may also want to get a sleep study done, and if you have sleep apnea, then focus on losing weight or wearing a CPAP mask at night so you're better rested the next day. Relaxing and proper rest plays a vital role in heart health, and personally speaking it's one of my biggest downfalls.

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